NSF funds research on driver and urban supply-chain networks to reduce congestion
Pamela Krewson Wertz

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded more than $446,000 for a new collaborative engineering project that will allow drivers to make more informed travel decisions and allow government organizations to better regulate travel within heavily congested major metropolitan areas.

Terry Friesz, Harold and Inge Marcus Chaired Professor in the Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Penn State, is the principal investigator (PI) on the two-year study dealing with “Statistical Learning for Dynamic Traffic Assignments (DTA).”

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$2.3 million NINDS grant to aid interpreting fMRI signal in infants and children

by Chris Spallino

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Penn State researchers have received funding from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to determine how the communication between neurons and blood vessels of the brain changes from postnatal development through adulthood, which would enable the use of hemodynamic imaging to study neural activity, plasticity, and neurodevelopmental disorders in infants, children and animals.

Patrick Drew, Huck Distinguished Associate Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Neurosurgery and Biomedical Engineering, and Nanyin Zhang, professor of biomedical and electrical engineering, are co-principal investigators on a five-year, $2.3 million proposal titled “A Multimodal Approach to Understanding the Development of Neurovascular Coupling.”

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Researchers investigate cold plasma's ability to fight infectious bacteria in the cardiovascular system

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The use of low-temperature plasma created by corona discharge — an electrical discharge formed by ionization of fluid that surrounds an ­electrically charged conductor — in medical applications shows great promise to revolutionize medical treatments. Known as plasma medicine, the emerging field combines physics, engineering, medicine and life sciences to study and improve medical treatment capabilities.

Researchers in Penn State’s College of Engineering, College of Agricultural Sciences and College of Medicine have been awarded a grant from the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering to investigate how low-temperature plasma produced in human blood can serve as a less invasive way to treat infectious bacterial growth on human tissue and prosthetic implants in the cardiovascular system. The researchers will also examine how the plasma affects the structure and function of the components of which blood is comprised.

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Researchers investigate cold plasma's ability to fight infectious bacteria in the cardiovascular system

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The use of low-temperature plasma created by corona discharge — an electrical discharge formed by ionization of fluid that surrounds an ­electrically charged conductor — in medical applications shows great promise to revolutionize medical treatments. Known as plasma medicine, the emerging field combines physics, engineering, medicine and life sciences to study and improve medical treatment capabilities.

Researchers in Penn State’s College of Engineering, College of Agricultural Sciences and College of Medicine have been awarded a grant from the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering to investigate how low-temperature plasma produced in human blood can serve as a less invasive way to treat infectious bacterial growth on human tissue and prosthetic implants in the cardiovascular system. The researchers will also examine how the plasma affects the structure and function of the components of which blood is comprised.

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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against the risks that come with cloud computing.

In recent years, we have seen an increase in the number of small and medium-sized businesses using cloud computing services.

If your business uses a cloud computing service, your data is stored on hardware owned by and housed at a different company. You access your information via a web-based service that you can log into from any of your company’s computers.

This system has its advantages. For example, it shifts the responsibility of buying and maintaining hardware and software from your business to your cloud computing service provider. You only need the right software and some computers from which you can run it.

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In the wild, cone snails harpoon their prey as it swims by. In the lab, the cone snail has learned to exchange venom for dinner. Here, a snail extends its proboscis and discharges a shot of venom into a latex-topped tube. Photo Credit: Alex Holt/NIST

Cone snails have inspired humans for centuries. Coastal communities have often traded their beautiful shells like money and put them in jewelry. Many artists, including Rembrandt, have featured them in sketches and paintings. Now, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are finding these deadly predators inspiring, too, as they seek new ways to cure old medical problems using the poisonous snails as models.

“This is the same venom used to kill dinosaurs in ‘Jurassic Park,’” says NIST biochemist Frank Marí, with a chuckle. “It is scary stuff, but that power could be used for a different kind of good in real life.”

Like all NIST scientists, Marí measures things. Specifically, he measures RNA and the associated proteins at work inside marine animals. As technology has improved over the years, he and his team have become better able to examine, analyze and catalog the molecules at work in some of the ocean’s lesser-known creatures, including cone snails. This year, his lab made several significant discoveries about their venom, discoveries that might ultimately lead to the development of new medicines for hard-to-treat diseases. By imitating the way that these small, quiet creatures deliver poison, scientists may be able to better deliver cures.

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